• Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah and Happy Holidays to all riders and readers! Thank you for being a part of the online community and big thanks to @Graves for his effort on this forum. -africatwin.org team

Anti-puncture liquids & gels - safe for a tube?

inexorable

Active Member
Aug 16, 2018
118
42
28
UK
#1
I'm guessing this is one of those can of worms threads where everyone has their own opinion.... but I don't have a fully formed opinion yet and I need one. ;)

I've always used a gloop type anti-puncture additive in the tyres for a sports bike. It's messy, but for a tubeless tyre I've seen its worth proven countless times. It wont stop a blowout but it will usually slow one down long enough to get to a controlled stop.... and you wont miss a puncture when there's bright luminous green goo sprayed all up your back and lid after a ride. 😂

Sooooo it seems I do have an opinion about tubeless tyres - but not tubes. Mainly because I only have about 250 miles experience with tubes and all in the last 2 weeks - I'm not counting my BMX as a kid.

I think my question is about safety. Honestly I have a bit of an odd fear of the tubes. I worry that a tube blowing out at 70mph is going to be a far worse affair than with a tubeless tyre.

Apart from the mess when trying to patch or change a tube is there any additional danger that using these gloopy things can add to a tubed tyre?

Extra wear or abrasion on the inside of the tube? Extra heat or wear from uneven or wobbly tube rotation due to wheel rotational forces throwing it around?

Wisdom required. :cool:
 

Graves

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2016
929
295
123
So. Cal.
#2
I can't speak to the sealers... but have found that HD tubes with lots of baby powder keeps the tubes happy, and a bit more puncture resistant.

I'm guessing this is one of those can of worms threads where everyone has their own opinion.... but I don't have a fully formed opinion yet and I need one. ;)

I've always used a gloop type anti-puncture additive in the tyres for a sports bike. It's messy, but for a tubeless tyre I've seen its worth proven countless times. It wont stop a blowout but it will usually slow one down long enough to get to a controlled stop.... and you wont miss a puncture when there's bright luminous green goo sprayed all up your back and lid after a ride. 😂

Sooooo it seems I do have an opinion about tubeless tyres - but not tubes. Mainly because I only have about 250 miles experience with tubes and all in the last 2 weeks - I'm not counting my BMX as a kid.

I think my question is about safety. Honestly I have a bit of an odd fear of the tubes. I worry that a tube blowing out at 70mph is going to be a far worse affair than with a tubeless tyre.

Apart from the mess when trying to patch or change a tube is there any additional danger that using these gloopy things can add to a tubed tyre?

Extra wear or abrasion on the inside of the tube? Extra heat or wear from uneven or wobbly tube rotation due to wheel rotational forces throwing it around?

Wisdom required. :cool:
 

Squily

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2016
159
105
103
Esperance Western Australia
#3
In my experience, goop only works on tubeless wheels. I think the carcass of the tyre is thick and stiff enough for the goop to do what its supposed to, but tubes are too thin and expand too much.

And for some reason, the goop makes it next to impossible to patch afterwards. Just can't get the tube clean and the rubber to vulcanise.
 

BobSill

Active Member
Aug 4, 2017
29
11
33
67
Edmonton, Alberta
#4
I'm guessing this is one of those can of worms threads where everyone has their own opinion.... but I don't have a fully formed opinion yet and I need one. ;)

I've always used a gloop type anti-puncture additive in the tyres for a sports bike. It's messy, but for a tubeless tyre I've seen its worth proven countless times. It wont stop a blowout but it will usually slow one down long enough to get to a controlled stop.... and you wont miss a puncture when there's bright luminous green goo sprayed all up your back and lid after a ride.

Sooooo it seems I do have an opinion about tubeless tyres - but not tubes. Mainly because I only have about 250 miles experience with tubes and all in the last 2 weeks - I'm not counting my BMX as a kid.

I think my question is about safety. Honestly I have a bit of an odd fear of the tubes. I worry that a tube blowing out at 70mph is going to be a far worse affair than with a tubeless tyre.

Apart from the mess when trying to patch or change a tube is there any additional danger that using these gloopy things can add to a tubed tyre?

Extra wear or abrasion on the inside of the tube? Extra heat or wear from uneven or wobbly tube rotation due to wheel rotational forces throwing it around?

Wisdom required. :cool:
I have been using RideOn balancing fluid this year with HD tubes in my K 60 rear and Motoz GPS front tire and had no problems so far after about 4,000 km of HWY and gravel road riding. My dealer uses it in all the off road and adventure bikes that they replace tires on, plus no stick on wheel weight (to fall off at the first wash)!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

inexorable

Active Member
Aug 16, 2018
118
42
28
UK
#5
When you fellas talk about HD tubes can you clarify what you mean.

Am I right in understanding there are 4 types...

- Lightweight
- Middle Weight
- Heavy Weight (HD)
- Ultra Heavy Weight (UHD)

... and if so, am I right in thinking that HD is ok (with powder) but Ultra is too heavy? As in too much heat build up etc.
 

Graves

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2016
929
295
123
So. Cal.
#6
Thicker tubes add puncture resistance but add pinch flat potential and unsprung weight, so you have to decide for yourself what you need. I ride a lot off road in So Cal mountains and desert (lots of rocks), and view rims as consumables that aren't expected to last the life of the bike, so for me it's the HD tubes and higher front pressure to help prevent pinch flats.

Here's what I do to my rims:
1541609723807.png




When you fellas talk about HD tubes can you clarify what you mean.

Am I right in understanding there are 4 types...

- Lightweight
- Middle Weight
- Heavy Weight (HD)
- Ultra Heavy Weight (UHD)

... and if so, am I right in thinking that HD is ok (with powder) but Ultra is too heavy? As in too much heat build up etc.
 

inexorable

Active Member
Aug 16, 2018
118
42
28
UK
#7
I love how everyone has such a different perspective on these things depending on environment / usage. Context is everything.

If I saw that rim here in the UK it's more likely I just ran over a badger, mounted a kerb and bounced off a pub or castle and into a tree. Depending on where I was of course. 😂

I certainly wouldn't be sitting there chillin' out with a "it's just a consumable" attitude. I like it 👍

I'm sure there are plenty of folk here that know where all the green lane trails are and would disagree - but me? I'm new and this looks expensive!

Consumable? That there is another bank loan 😂
 

Graves

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2016
929
295
123
So. Cal.
#8
Ya crush enough things you learn to expect it. My exhaust head pipe has several dents in it as well, those are consumables too. I don't know how many dirt bike pipes I've bought over the years... bent frames, broken foot peg mounts, plastic, handle bars, engine side covers... it can be an expensive hobby.

I love how everyone has such a different perspective on these things depending on environment / usage. Context is everything.

If I saw that rim here in the UK it's more likely I just ran over a badger, mounted a kerb and bounced off a pub or castle and into a tree. Depending on where I was of course. 😂

I certainly wouldn't be sitting there chillin' out with a "it's just a consumable" attitude. I like it 👍

I'm sure there are plenty of folk here that know where all the green lane trails are and would disagree - but me? I'm new and this looks expensive!

Consumable? That there is another bank loan 😂
 
Likes: BobSill

About us

  • Africatwin.org was established in 2015 to provide adventure motorcyclists an online community focusing on the Honda Africa Twin. The forum has grown exponentially through the years with excellent and insightful content. As a result of our growth, africatwin.org has expanded its media network to provide editorial content to the adventure riding community. Africatwin.org is not affiliated with Honda Motor Co. and any opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the author and do not represent Honda Motor Co. or africatwin.org.

Quick Navigation

User Menu