CRF1100L left/right weight non compensated

alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
Hi guys,

I just want to know if someone tried to release both hands from the handlebar while the motorbike is running.

Mine is a CRF1100L ATAS DCT

In my case the motorbike tends to move to the right automatically. It looks like the extra 20kg of the DCT (right side) and the exhaust (right side too) helps to that.

When using both hands (yes, like you should do always), motorbike is totally stable, so I dont think is a steering problem. Did anyone have the same behaviour than me?

Thanks!

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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2017
204
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ONTARIO, CANADA
Pues, este es no differente.
It could be the winds or the shape of the road.
On a "quiet" country road I can take both hands off of the bars and ride on a straight road, using my bum to shift my weight to control the direction of the bike. Please do not try this on a windy day or on a twisty road.
Don't do this in a populated area, and depending on where you ride, don't let la policia catch you doing this.
I practice this from time to time.
SHUMBA


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Graves

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Aug 14, 2016
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So. Cal.
Hi guys,

I just want to know if someone tried to release both hands from the handlebar while the motorbike is running.

Mine is a CRF1100L ATAS DCT

In my case the motorbike tends to move to the right automatically. It looks like the extra 20kg of the DCT (right side) and the exhaust (right side too) helps to that.

When using both hands (yes, like you should do always), motorbike is totally stable, so I dont think is a steering problem. Did anyone have the same behaviour than me?

Thanks!

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First off, welcome to the group.

Barring anything sent askew from a previous off, I’d say that you’ll find that you’re causing the problem. How many times have we witnessed a bike bucking the rider off only to see the bike continue a straight and true line on its own. It’s the monkey, not the banana.
 
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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2017
204
54
148
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ONTARIO, CANADA
First off, welcome to the group.

Barring anything sent askew from a previous off, I’d say that you’ll find that you’re causing the problem. How many times have we witnessed a bike bucking the rider off only to see the bike continue a straight and true line on its own. It’s the monkey, not the banana.
Ha ha...nice!!
SHUMBA

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alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
First off, welcome to the group.

Barring anything sent askew from a previous off, I’d say that you’ll find that you’re causing the problem. How many times have we witnessed a bike bucking the rider off only to see the bike continue a straight and true line on its own. It’s the monkey, not the banana.
Don't you think I probably tried with anyone else than me? And same result. So before telling me I'm the cause to pull to the right, ask to me first.

I would appreciate more interesting answers. Do you have also CFR1100L DCT?

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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2017
204
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ONTARIO, CANADA
Don't you think I probably tried with anyone else than me? And same result. So before telling me I'm the cause to pull to the right, ask to me first.

I would appreciate more interesting answers. Do you have also CFR1100L DCT?

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Ah com 'on....
It has to be either the road, or the wind. Or possibly your position while seated on the bike...
Often to keep the bike tracking straight ahead, I will have to lean my body weight.
Whoever said "monkey and banana"...
although a tad rude...
I think it was his way of telling you that you were doing something wrong.
Y, no se offenden...
SHUMBA


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alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
If you Google something like "africa twin pulls to right" you will see I'm not the only one with this "problem", so I'm checking if someone else have experienced the same behaviour.

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Graves

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Legendary Rider
Aug 14, 2016
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Ah com 'on....
It has to be either the road, or the wind. Or possibly your position while seated on the bike...
Often to keep the bike tracking straight ahead, I will have to lean my body weight.
Whoever said "monkey and banana"...
although a tad rude...
I think it was his way of telling you that you were doing something wrong.
Y, no se offenden...
SHUMBA


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I wasn’t trying to be rude, it’s just that I learned long ago that I was the monkey when I thought that there was something wrong with my bike.. I mean banana.
 

Graves

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“… Do you have also CFR1100L DCT?”
Nope, I have a CRF1000L. I’ve had many bikes over my 48 years of motorcycling, new and used, new models to the market and old and I’ve been a professional mechanic all my adult working life, so I have a little experience with how a motorcycle works. If your bike hasn’t been crashed and you haven’t been, pardon me, monkeying around with it, then it’s probably fine. Have you checked the wheel alignment?
 
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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2017
204
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ONTARIO, CANADA
Nope, I have a CRF1000L. I’ve had many bikes over my 48 years of motorcycling, new and used, new models to the market and old and I’ve been a professional mechanic all my adult working life, so I have a little experience with how a motorcycle works. If your bike hasn’t been crashed and you haven’t been, pardon me, monkeying around with it, then it’s probably fine. Have you checked the wheel alignment?
Good call or comment.
This afternoon I went a ride, mostly tarmac (paved) roads.
It was a little windy though.
I practiced riding with my my hands off of the bars.
I leaned to the left, butt, ha ha I kept my arse flet on the seat. I was able to steer the bike and keep it tracking straight ahead.
2020 Africa Twin DCT model non adventure.
SHUMBA



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alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
Good call or comment.
This afternoon I went a ride, mostly tarmac (paved) roads.
It was a little windy though.
I practiced riding with my my hands off of the bars.
I leaned to the left, butt, ha ha I kept my arse flet on the seat. I was able to steer the bike and keep it tracking straight ahead.
2020 Africa Twin DCT model non adventure.
SHUMBA



Sent from my SM-A715W using Tapatalk
Yes but looks like you have to "concentrate" and compensate with you body to keep the moto straight, is that right?

That is, do you think this motorbike would run all straight if nobody were riding it? (dont do it at home :))

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SHUMBA

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2017
204
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ONTARIO, CANADA
Hmmmm....to answer your question, "would the motorcycle track straight ahead without a rider"
In theory, yes it would, unless it was disturbed by the road surface or wind.
It's the gyro or the rotation of the wheels that cause the motorcycle or bicycle to remain upright.
SHUMBA


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alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
Yes I know the gyroscopic effect. I was referring to YOUR bike, and mine as well. Due that you said you have to move and lean to the left to keep the moto straight.

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Shadowjack

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2018
111
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Great Plains
You could try purposely "misaligning" the rear wheel to see how the behavior changes. Won't hurt the chain for the small distance it takes to feel it. Then set it perfectly and see where you are. Measure both sides from the center of the axle to the center of the swingarm pivot, don't use the stickers.
 

Graves

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You could try purposely "misaligning" the rear wheel to see how the behavior changes. Won't hurt the chain for the small distance it takes to feel it. Then set it perfectly and see where you are. Measure both sides from the center of the axle to the center of the swingarm pivot, don't use the stickers.
Close. You get a better alignment by adjusting the rear wheel to the front, frames aren’t perfect either.
 

Shadowjack

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2018
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Great Plains
Close. You get a better alignment by adjusting the rear wheel to the front, frames aren’t perfect either.

I know we've been advised to align the wheels with a straightedge since the Flood, but I'm going to be blunt, that's not what you should do. The rear axle must be parallel with the transmission output shaft, otherwise the chain WILL eat the sprockets. This alignment is critical when the frames are built. Since the swingarm pivot is only a couple of inches from the output shaft, that part of the frame would have to be seriously and obviously bent before they would be nonparallel with each other. Much easier for the frame to be out of alignment somewhere in the two feet or so between the swingarm and the steering head.
 

Graves

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Aug 14, 2016
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I know we've been advised to align the wheels with a straightedge since the Flood, but I'm going to be blunt, that's not what you should do. The rear axle must be parallel with the transmission output shaft, otherwise the chain WILL eat the sprockets. This alignment is critical when the frames are built. Since the swingarm pivot is only a couple of inches from the output shaft, that part of the frame would have to be seriously and obviously bent before they would be nonparallel with each other. Much easier for the frame to be out of alignment somewhere in the two feet or so between the swingarm and the steering head.
To each his own… have the bike not dog tracking and risk a little wear, or go down the road with your rear end off to one side. Have you seen how much side to side slop there is in the sprocket/chain union? Not a real precision fit.
 

Shadowjack

Well-Known Member
Mar 15, 2018
111
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118
Great Plains
Well, if the choice is to compensate for some misalignment between the wheels with misalignment between the axle and transmission, I guess I'd do that, long enough to remedy whatever was wrong with the frame, or to get rid of the bike. They're not supposed to be that way, and I would guess that it still wouldn't track properly. Which is where we came in.
 

Black99S

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2016
145
82
148
BC, Canada
Riding down a long hill I can stand on the pegs with arms in the wind and steer the bike anywhere I want with my feet. Sitting down on the same hill I can do the same by pressing on my feet. I can compensate for the road camber and wheel ruts.
If you Don't like that idea then try moving your heavy head a bit with hands off bars - you can steer that way as well.

It's all just weight shift and the bike is well balanced.

PS. My chain and sprockets are aligned (straight edge clamped to rear sprocket)
 

alecsnavarro

New Member
May 30, 2021
6
1
3
Badalona
Well, I give you some news guys. I took the bike to my regular mechanic and he confirmed that something is wrong in the fork. Taking the hands off of the handlebar makes the bike to pull to the right "more than the expected"

So I will let him the bike some week after summer and he will check deeply, first making a fork alignment.

On regular running you dont notice about that, is just when taking hands off, you can make a thousand kms with no pain.

Rest of bike is ok, so lets see in the future how this ends.

Thanks for you suggestions guys.!

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