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Wheel bearings

egary1974

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2017
96
36
48
Arkansas
#21
That does make sense with the water and cooling but unless you just stop riding directly after the water wouldn't to bearing return to running temp and drive off the water? Possibly... possibly not who knows, I was just saying "in my experience" as a machinist bearing usually fail prematurely due to undue loads (axial vs. Radial vs. Thrust) and or manufacturer's defects but that being said this is an internet forum, I have not personally inspected said bearing so what I've said is mearly an opinion...
Often times I stop IN the water!


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RItwin

New Member
Jul 31, 2018
29
10
3
R.I. USA
#22
Let’s say for discussion sake that the spacers are made of mild steel.
Ok for mild steel it has a compressive yield strength of 36,259.43 psi and a tensile yield strength of 53,700 psi at room temp and goes down from there the colder you get, that being said for a 1/2"- 3/4" axle and spacer you are dangerously close to if not exeeded the yeild point at max torque... now I doubt they are going to use mild steel on those parts or recommend max fastener torque but even at 2/3 max torque you will get some yielding but it is usually more plastic and will return to original shape when released

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Likes: Admin

RItwin

New Member
Jul 31, 2018
29
10
3
R.I. USA
#25
Those are high yield pressures does that mean the steel breaks at those pressures?


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The term yield is used to define the point at which a substance just starts to deform or stretch or "YIELD" , the point at which it fails entirely us usually called a "mechanical failure" but once a substance such as steel begins to yield it "can" fail at any point after that

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RItwin

New Member
Jul 31, 2018
29
10
3
R.I. USA
#27
The pressures above are so high they sound unreachable


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They may sound unreachable but I can assure you they are quite reachable. Have ever snapped a bolt or the head off one while trying to remove a "STUCK" fastener.....? Or even had a very stuck bolt or fastener (not rusted or corroded) usually it is because the fastener has had so much pressure on the threads that the have started to gall and deformed in the hole which is the metal actually yielding. even before a situation like that have you ever had to use a "breaker bar"? Chances are if it is not corroded the reason you need a breaker bar is to release the massive amount of clamping load on the fastener and overcome the friction it has produced. which is why properly torquing fasteners is so important

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Likes: kristofh

RItwin

New Member
Jul 31, 2018
29
10
3
R.I. USA
#29
I totally agree but it is possible, ive seen it may times and im not saying you guys do but after repairing far too many pieces of machinery for people I have come to realize not all people have that hard to find thing "common sense" if you catch drift hahahaha 🤣
 
Likes: Squily

egary1974

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2017
96
36
48
Arkansas
#30
They may sound unreachable but I can assure you they are quite reachable. Have ever snapped a bolt or the head off one while trying to remove a "STUCK" fastener.....? Or even had a very stuck bolt or fastener (not rusted or corroded) usually it is because the fastener has had so much pressure on the threads that the have started to gall and deformed in the hole which is the metal actually yielding. even before a situation like that have you ever had to use a "breaker bar"? Chances are if it is not corroded the reason you need a breaker bar is to release the massive amount of clamping load on the fastener and overcome the friction it has produced. which is why properly torquing fasteners is so important

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Torque is twisting force those other two are linear pressures that are forces applied long ways along the bolt with no twisting When you multiply by can cross sectional area right? They can’t be the same thing. If they were the threads which have a lower profile would always yield and strip out before the main cross section of the bolt snaps when torquing.


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Jul 31, 2018
29
10
3
R.I. USA
#31
They ARE two separate forces BUT The forces are complimentary to each other due to the principal of the archimedes screw the more radial torque force that is applied the screw the more axial clamping psi the head of the bolt exerts on the piece being clamped and the threads and Visa versa if the head of the bolt was not there to stop the screw from turning it would be purely a torque force, a good test is place a bolt in a vice with a spacer or plate in between the head and the nut as if you were bolting something together, then get a good set of calipers and measure the length of the bolt, then properly torque the bolt and measure then over torque and measure, then release and measure you will get 4 different measurements meaning the bolt is streching linearly as you say but the forces applied are all complimentary to eachother
 

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